FIXTURES AND FITTINGS
reproduced from 'The Church Guide Book'





The gallery at the West end of the church was built in the 17th century and had an upper companion gallery for the church musicians, which remained in place until 1846, the position now occupied by the organ pipes moved there in 1960.




The gallery and organ circa 1960
Here are several monuments to past parishioners on the walls of the church and the following are of special note.

At the East end of the South wall of the chancel over the Victorian sedile is the monument to Thomas Brome who died in 1673. This is a large architectural tablet surmounted by a pediment and crest. It was sculptured by Jasper Latham, one of Sir Christopher Wren’s principal masons working on St. Paul's Cathedral.

At the West end, is the tablet to Doctor Thomas Young, 1829, who was responsible for unravelling the mysteries of the Egyptian hieroglyphics. He is buried in the chancel in the family vault of the Maxwell family into which he married.

On the South wall of the nave next to the gallery, is the painted board commemorating the Benefaction of George Dalton to the parish in 1566. Today, the "Rush Sermon" is still preached on the appropriate day, the floor of the nave being strewn with cut flags (wild Iris), leaves and other herbs

Almost opposite on the North wall of the nave, is the large Epstein-like bronze by Elsie March, a member of the local artist family, who made the bronze figures for the Canadian National War Memorial in Ottawa. This is a memorial to Mrs. Kelly, wife of a former Rector. [see also churchyard].


The most recent addition to the fittings in the church is a plaque in memory of the late Lord Avebury.

This was unveiled in St. Giles Church on Sunday 3rd July 2016.  A number of members of the family were present, and a short address was given by his son Lyulph Lubbock, now the 5th Baron Avebury. .

The Brass Eagle Lectern, from which the Bible is read, is a memorial to Sergeant Frederick Shells of the 34th Imperial Yeomanry, Middlesex, killed at Senekal, South Africa in 1900.

  The lectern  Elsie March bronze      The George Dalton Benefaction

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